Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Parsing HID Unit Items

This post explains how to parse the HID Unit Global Item as explained by the HID Specification, page 37. The table there is quite confusing and it took me a while to fully understand it (Benjamin Tissoires was really the one who cracked it). I couldn't find any better explanation online which means either I'm incredibly dense and everyone's figured it out or no-one has posted a better explanation. On the off-chance it's the latter [1], here are the instructions on how to parse this item.

We know a HID Report Descriptor consists of a number of items that describe the content of each HID Report (read: an event from a device). These Items include things like Logical Minimum/Maximum for axis ranges, etc. A HID Unit item specifies the physical unit to apply. For example, a Report Descriptor may specify that X and Y axes are in mm which can be quite useful for all the obvious reasons.

Like most HID items, a HID Unit Item consists of a one-byte item tag and 1, 2 or 4 byte payload. The Unit item in the Report Descriptor itself has the binary value 0110 01nn where the nn is either 1, 2, or 3 indicating 1, 2 or 4 bytes of payload, respectively. That's standard HID.

The payload is divided into nibbles (4-bit units) and goes from LSB to MSB. The lowest-order 4 bits (first byte & 0xf) define the unit System to apply: one of SI Linear, SI Rotation, English Linear or English Rotation (well, or None/Reserved). The rest of the nibbles are in this order: "length", "mass", "time", "temperature", "current", "luminous intensity". In something resembling code this means:

 system = value & 0xf
 length_exponent = (value & 0xf0) >> 4
 mass_exponent   = (value & 0xf00) >> 8
 time_exponent   = (value & 0xf000) >> 12
 ...
 
The System defines which unit is used for length (e.g. SILinear means length is in cm). The actual value of each nibble is the exponent for the unit in use [2]. In something resembling code:
 switch (system)
   case SILinear: 
     print("length is in cm^{length_exponent}"); 
     break;
   case SIRotation: 
     print("length is in rad^{length_exponent}");
     break;
   case EnglishLinear: 
     print("length is in in^{length_exponent}");
     break;
   case EnglishRotation:
     print("length is in deg^{length_exponent}");
     break;
   case None:
   case Reserved"
     print("boo!");
     break;
 

For example, the value 0x321 means "SI Linear" (0x1) so the remaining nibbles represent, in ascending nibble order: Centimeters, Grams, Seconds, Kelvin, Ampere, Candela. The length nibble has a value of 0x2 so it's square cm, the mass nibble has a value of 0x3 so it is cubic grams (well, it's just an example, so...). This means that any report containing this item comes in cm²g³. As a more realistic example: 0xF011 would be cm/s.

If we changed the lowest nibble to English Rotation (0x4), i.e. our value is now 0x324, the units represent: Degrees, Slug, Seconds, F, Ampere, Candela [3]. The length nibble 0x2 means square degrees, the mass nibble is cubic slugs. As a more realistic example, 0xF014 would be degrees/s.

Any nibble with value 0 means the unit isn't in use, so the example from the spec with value 0x00F0D121 is SI linear, units cm² g s⁻³ A⁻¹, which is... Voltage! Of course you knew that and totally didn't have to double-check with wikipedia.

Because bits are expensive and the base units are of course either too big or too small or otherwise not quite right, HID also provides a Unit Exponent item. The Unit Exponent item (a separate item to Unit in the Report Descriptor) then describes the exponent to be applied to the actual value in the report. For example, a Unit Eponent of -3 means 10⁻³ to be applied to the value. If the report descriptor specifies an item of Unit 0x00F0D121 (i.e. V) and Unit Exponent -3, the value of this item is mV (milliVolt), Unit Exponent of 3 would be kV (kiloVolt).

Now, in hindsight all this is pretty obvious and maybe even sensible. It'd have been nice if the spec would've explained it a bit clearer but then I would have nothing to write about, so I guess overall I call it a draw.

[1] This whole adventure was started because there's a touchpad out there that measures touch pressure in radians, so at least one other person out there struggled with the docs...
[2] The nibble value is twos complement (i.e. it's a signed 4-bit integer). Values 0x1-0x7 are exponents 1 to 7, values 0x8-0xf are exponents -8 to -1.
[3] English Linear should've trolled everyone and use Centimetres instead of Centimeters in SI Linear.