Monday, January 19, 2015

xf86-input-libinput compatibility with evdev and synaptics

A Fedora 22 feature is to use the libinput X.Org driver as default driver for all non-tablet devices. This replaces the current defaults of synaptics for touchpads and evdev for anything else (tablets usually use the wacom driver, if installed). As expected, changing a default has some repercussions both for users and for developers. These are outlined below, based on the libinput 0.8 release. Future versions may add features, so check with your latest local version. Generally, the behaviour should roughly stay the same, big changes such as devices not being detected or not working is most likely a bug. Some behaviours are new, e.g. always-on palm detection, top software buttons on specific touchpads, etc. If in doubt, check the libinput documentation for hints on whether something is supposed to work in a particular manner.

Changes visible to Users

Any custom xorg.conf snippets will cease to work, if they are properly stacked. Options set by snippets are almost always exclusive to one particular driver. When the default driver changes, the snippet may not apply to the device anymore. Whether they stop working depends whether the Driver line is present. Consider this example snippet:
Section "InputClass"
  Identifier "enable tapping"
  MatchProduct "my touchpad"
  Driver "synaptics"
  Option "TapButton1" "1"
EndSection
This snippet does two things: it assigns the synaptics driver to the "my mouse" device and sets the option TapButton1. The assignment will override the default libinput assignment, i.e. this device won't change behaviour, you just don't get to use any new features. If the Driver line is not present then this snippet won't do anything, the libinput driver does not provide a TapButton1 option. It is safe to leave the snippet in place, options that are not supported by a driver are simply ignored.

The xf86-input-libinput man page has a list of options that can be set. For example, the above snippet would have an equivalent as

Section "InputClass"
  Identifier "enable tapping"
  MatchDriver "libinput"
  MatchProduct "my touchpad"
  Option "Tapping" "on"
EndSection
Note that this matches on a driver rather than assign the driver. Since options are driver-specific this is the correct approach.

The other visible change is a difference in default pointer speed. We have fine-tuning pointer acceleration on our TODO lists, but we're not quite there yet and any help would be appreciated. In the meantime you may see changes in pointer acceleration.

Finally, you may see certain features have gone the way of the dodo. Specifically the touchpad code exposes a lot less knobs to tweak. Most of that is intentional, some of it may warrant discussion. If there is a particular feature you are missing or doesn't work as you want to, please file a bug.

Changes visible to developers

These changes affect desktop environments, specifically the part that configures input devices. The changes affect three categories: pointer acceleration, button mapping, touchpad disabling and device properties. The property "libinput Send Events Modes Available" exists on all devices, it can be used to determine if a device is handled by the libinput driver.

Pointer acceleration

The X server exposes a variety of knobs for its pointer acceleration code. The oldest knob (and specified in the core protocol) is the XChangePointerControl request. In some environments this is exposed as a single slider, in others it's split into multiple settings (Acceleration and Threshold, for example).

libinput does away with this and only exposes a single 1-value float property "libinput Accel Speed" with a range of -1 (slowest) to 1 (fastest). The XChangePointerControl request has no effect on a libinput device. It is up to you how to map the current speed mappings into the [-1, 1] range.

Button mapping

The X server provides button mapping through the XSetPointerMapping request. This is most commonly used to apply a left-handed configuration and to enable natural scrolling. The call will continue to work with the libinput driver, but better methods are available.

The property "libinput Left Handed Enabled" takes a single boolean 8-bit value to enable and disable left-handed mode. Unlike the X request this will automatically take care of the tapping configuration (and other things in the future). If the property is not available on a device, that device has no left-handed mode.

The property "libinput Natural Scrolling Enabled" takes a single boolean 8-bit value to enable and disable natural scrolling. This applies to smooth scrolling and legacy button scrolling (which the libinput driver doesn't do anyway). If the property is not available on a device, that device has no natural scrolling mode.

Touchpad disabling

In the synaptics driver, disabling the touchpad is usually done with the "Synaptics Off" property. This is used by syndaemon to turn the touchpad off while typing. libinput does this by default, so it is safe to simply ignore this at all. Don't bother starting syndaemon, it won't control the libinput driver.

Device properties

Any code that handles a driver-specific property (prefixed by "evdev" or "synaptics") will stop working. These properties are not exposed by the libinput driver (we tried, it was not viable). KDE's kcm_touchpad module is a particularly bad offender here, it exposes almost every toggle the driver ever had. Make sure the code behaves well if the properties are not present and you're basically good to go.

If you decide to handle libinput-specific properties, the general rule is: if a single-value property is not present, that configuration does not apply to this device. Bitmask-style properties are split into an "libinput foo Available" and "libinput foo Enabled". The former lists the available settings, the latter enables a specific setting. Have a look at the xf86-input-libinput source for details on each property.

4 comments:

pal said...

The property "libinput Natural Scrolling Enabled" takes a single boolean 8-bit value to enable and disable left-handed mode

looks like copy-paste

Peter Hutterer said...

fixed, thanks

בנימין סגל said...

how can I change the scrolling speed, it is way to fast?

Thanks for all the hard work

Vasily Khoruzhick said...

I've used to use touchpad configuration from [1] on my x230, since default settings aren't usable, cursor is too jumpy/jerky. How do I configure these parameters with libinput? Thanks!

[1] https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Lenovo_ThinkPad_X230#Touchpad