Thursday, September 23, 2021

What's new in XI 2.4 - touchpad gestures

After a nine year hiatus, a new version of the X Input Protocol is out. Credit for the work goes to Povilas Kanapickas, who also implemented support for XI 2.4 in the various pieces of the stack [0]. So let's have a look.

X has had touch events since XI 2.2 (2012) but those were only really useful for direct touch devices (read: touchscreens). There were accommodations for indirect touch devices like touchpads but they were never used. The synaptics driver set the required bits for a while but it was dropped in 2015 because ... it was complicated to make use of and no-one seemed to actually use it anyway. Meanwhile, the rest of the world moved on and touchpad gestures are now prevalent. They've been standard in MacOS for ages, in Windows for almost ages and - with recent GNOME releases - now feature prominently on the Linux desktop as well. They have been part of libinput and the Wayland protocol for years (and even recently gained a new set of "hold" gestures). Meanwhile, X was left behind in the dust or mud, depending on your local climate.

XI 2.4 fixes this, it adds pinch and swipe gestures to the XI2 protocol and makes those available to supporting clients [2]. Notably here is that the interpretation of gestures is left to the driver [1]. The server takes the gestures and does the required state handling but otherwise has no decision into what constitutes a gesture. This is of course no different to e.g. 2-finger scrolling on a touchpad where the server just receives scroll events and passes them on accordingly.

XI 2.4 gesture events are quite similar to touch events in that they are processed as a sequence of begin/update/end with both types having their own event types. So the events you will receive are e.g. XIGesturePinchBegin or XIGestureSwipeUpdate. As with touch events, a client must select for all three (begin/update/end) on a window. Only one gesture can exist at any time, so if you are a multi-tasking octopus prepare to be disappointed.

Because gestures are tied to an indirect-touch device, the location they apply at is wherever the cursor is currently positioned. In that, they work similar to button presses, and passive grabs apply as expected too. So long-term the window manager will likely want a passive grab on the root window for swipe gestures while applications will implement pinch-to-zoom as you'd expect.

In terms of API there are no suprises. libXi 1.8 is the version to implement the new features and there we have a new XIGestureClassInfo returned by XIQueryDevice and of course the two events: XIGesturePinchEvent and XIGestureSwipeEvent. Grabbing is done via e.g. XIGrabSwipeGestureBegin, so for those of you with XI2 experience this will all look familiar. For those of you without - it's probably no longer worth investing time into becoming an XI2 expert.

Overall, it's a nice addition to the protocol and it will help getting the X server slightly closer to Wayland for a widely-used feature. Once GTK, mutter and all the other pieces in the stack are in place, it will just work for any (GTK) application that supports gestures under Wayland already. The same will be true for Qt I expect.

X server 21.1 will be out in a few weeks, xf86-input-libinput 1.2.0 is already out and so are xorgproto 2021.5 and libXi 1.8.

[0] In addition to taking on the Xorg release, so clearly there are no limits here
[1] More specifically: it's done by libinput since neither xf86-input-evdev nor xf86-input-synaptics will ever see gestures being implemented
[2] Hold gestures missed out on the various deadlines

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

An Xorg release without Xwayland

Xorg is about to released.

And it's a release without Xwayland.

And... wait, what?

Let's unwind this a bit, and ideally you should come away with a better understanding of Xorg vs Xwayland, and possibly even Wayland itself.

Heads up: if you are familiar with X, the below is simplified to the point it hurts. Sorry about that, but as an X developer you're probably good at coping with pain.

Let's go back to the 1980s, when fashion was weird and there were still reasons to be optimistic about the future. Because this is a thought exercise, we go back with full hindsight 20/20 vision and, ideally, the winning Lotto numbers in case we have some time for some self-indulgence.

If we were to implement an X server from scratch, we'd come away with a set of components. libxprotocol that handles the actual protocol wire format parsing and provides a C api to access that (quite like libxcb, actually). That one will just be the protocol-to-code conversion layer.

We'd have a libxserver component which handles all the state management required for an X server to actually behave like an X server (nothing in the X protocol require an X server to display anything). That library has a few entry points for abstract input events (pointer and keyboard, because this is the 80s after all) and a few exit points for rendered output.

libxserver uses libxprotocol but that's an implementation detail, we can ignore the protocol for the rest of the post.

Let's create a github organisation and host those two libraries. We now have: http://github.com/x/libxserver and http://github.com/x/libxprotocol [1].

Now, to actually implement a working functional X server, our new project would link against libxserver hook into this library's API points. For input, you'd use libinput and pass those events through, for output you'd use the modesetting driver that knows how to scream at the hardware until something finally shows up. This is somewhere between outrageously simplified and unacceptably wrong but it'll do for this post.

Your X server has to handle a lot of the hardware-specifics but other than that it's a wrapper around libxserver which does the work of ... well, being an X server.

Our stack looks like this:

+------------------------+
|  xserver   [libxserver]|--------[ X client ]
|                        |
|[libinput] [modesetting]|
+------------------------+
|       kernel           |
+------------------------+
Hooray, we have re-implemented Xorg. Or rather, XFree86 because we're 20 years from all the pent-up frustratrion that caused the Xorg fork. Let's host this project on http://github.com/x/xorg

Now, let's say instead of physical display devices, we want to render into an framebuffer, and we have no input devices.

+------------------------+
|  xserver   [libxserver]|--------[ X client ]
|                        |
|            [write()]   |
+------------------------+
|       some buffer      |
+------------------------+
This is basically Xvfb or, if you are writing out PostScript, Xprint. Let's host those on github too, we're accumulating quite a set of projects here.

Now, let's say those buffers are allocated elsewhere and we're just rendering to them. And those buffer are passed to us via an IPC protocol, like... Wayland!

+------------------------+
|  xserver   [libxserver]|--------[ X client ]
|                        |
|input events    [render]|
+------------------------+
      |            |
+------------------------+
|   Wayland compositor   |
+------------------------+
And voila, we have Xwayland. If you swap out the protocol you can have Xquartz (X on Macos) or Xwin (X on Windows) or Xnext/Xephyr (X on X) or Xvnc (X over VNC). The principle is always the same.

Fun fact: the Wayland compositor doesn't need to run on the hardware, you can play display server matryoshka until you run out of turtles.

In our glorious revisioned past all these are distinct projects, re-using libxserver and some external libraries where needed. Depending on the projects things may be very simple or get very complex, it depends on how we render things.

But in the end, we have several independent projects all providing us with an X server process - the specific X bits are done in libxserver though. We can release Xwayland without having to release Xorg or Xvfb.

libxserver won't need a lot of releases, the behaviour is largely specified by the protocol requirements and once you're done implementing it, it'll be quite a slow-moving project.

Ok, now, fast forward to 2021, lose some hindsight, hope, and attitude and - oh, we have exactly the above structure. Except that it's not spread across multiple independent repos on github, it's all sitting in the same git directory: our Xorg, Xwayland, Xvfb, etc. are all sitting in hw/$name, and libxserver is basically the rest of the repo.

A traditional X server release was a tag in that git directory. An XWayland-only release is basically an rm -rf hw/*-but-not-xwayland followed by a tag, an Xorg-only release is basically an rm -rf hw/*-but-not-xfree86 [2].

In theory, we could've moved all these out into separate projects a while ago but the benefits are small and no-one has the time for that anyway.

So there you have it - you can have Xorg-only or XWayland-only releases without the world coming to an end.

Now, for the "Xorg is dead" claims - it's very likely that the current release will be the last Xorg release. [3] There is little interest in an X server that runs on hardware, or rather: there's little interest in the effort required to push out releases. Povilas did a great job in getting this one out but again, it's likely this is the last release. [4]

Xwayland - very different, it'll hang around for a long time because it's "just" a protocol translation layer. And of course the interest is there, so we have volunteers to do the releases.

So basically: expecting Xwayland releases, be surprised (but not confused) by Xorg releases.

[1] Github of course doesn't exist yet because we're in the 80s. Time-travelling is complicated.
[2] Historical directory name, just accept it.
[3] Just like the previous release...
[4] At least until the next volunteer steps ups. Turns out the problem "no-one wants to work on this" is easily fixed by "me! me! I want to work on this". A concept that is apparently quite hard to understand in the peanut gallery.

Tuesday, August 31, 2021

libinput and high-resolution wheel scrolling

Gut Ding braucht Weile. Almost three years ago, we added high-resolution wheel scrolling to the kernel (v5.0). The desktop stack however was first lagging and eventually left behind (except for an update a year ago or so, see here). However, I'm happy to announce that thanks to José Expósito's efforts, we now pushed it across the line. So - in a socially distanced manner and masked up to your eyebrows - gather round children, for it is storytime.

Historical History

In the beginning, there was the wheel detent. Or rather there were 24 of them, dividing a 360 degree [1] movement of a wheel into a neat set of 15 clicks. libinput exposed those wheel clicks as part of the "pointer axis" namespace and you could get the click count with libinput_event_pointer_get_axis_discrete() (announced here). The degree value is exposed as libinput_event_pointer_get_axis_value(). Other scroll backends (finger-scrolling or button-based scrolling) expose the pixel-precise value via that same function.

In a "recent" Microsoft Windows version (Vista!), MS added the ability for wheels to trigger more than 24 clicks per rotation. The MS Windows API now treats one "traditional" wheel click as a value of 120, anything finer-grained will be a fraction thereof. You may have a mouse that triggers quarter-wheel clicks, each sending a value of 30. This makes for smoother scrolling and is supported(-ish) by a lot of mice introduced in the last 10 years [2]. Obviously, three small scrolls are nicer than one large scroll, so the UX is less bad than before.

Now it's time for libinput to catch up with Windows Vista! For $reasons, the existing pointer axis API could get changed to accommodate for the high-res values, so a new API was added for scroll events. Read on for the details, you will believe what happens next.

Out with the old, in with the new

As of libinput 1.19, libinput has three new events: LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_WHEEL, LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_FINGER, and LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_SCROLL_CONTINUOUS. These events reflect, perhaps unsuprisingly, scroll movements of a wheel, a finger or along a continuous axis (e.g. button scrolling). And they replace the old event LIBINPUT_EVENT_POINTER_AXIS. Those familiar with libinput will notice that the new event names encode the scroll source in the event name now. This makes them slightly more flexible and saves callers an extra call.

In terms of actual API, the new events have two new functions: libinput_event_pointer_get_scroll_value(). For the FINGER and CONTINUOUS events, the value returned is in "pixels" [3]. For the new WHEEL events, the value is in degrees. IOW this is a drop-in replacement for the old libinput_event_pointer_get_axis_value() function. The second call is libinput_event_pointer_get_scroll_value_v120() which, for WHEEL events, returns the 120-based logical units the kernel uses as well. libinput_event_pointer_has_axis() returns true if the given axis has a value, just as before. With those three calls you now get the data for the new events.

Backwards compatibility

To ensure backwards compatibility, libinput generates both old and new events so the rule for callers is: if you want to support the new events, just ignore the old ones completely. libinput also guarantees new events even on pre-5.0 kernels. This makes the old and new code easy to ifdef out, and once you get past the immediate event handling the code paths are virtually identical.

When, oh when?

These changes have been merged into the libinput main branch and will be part of libinput 1.19. Which is due to be released over the next month or so, so feel free to work backwards from that for your favourite distribution.

Having said that, libinput is merely the lowest block in the Jenga tower that is the desktop stack. José linked to the various MRs in the upstream libinput MR, so if you're on your seat's edge waiting for e.g. GTK to get this, well, there's an MR for that.

[1] That's degrees of an angle, not Fahrenheit
[2] As usual, on a significant number of those you'll need to know whatever proprietary protocol the vendor deemed to be important IP. Older MS mice stand out here because they use straight HID.
[3] libinput doesn't really have a concept of pixels, but it has a normalized pixel that movements are defined as. Most callers take that as real pixels except for the high-resolution displays where it's appropriately scaled.

Flatpak portals - how do they work?

I've been working on portals recently and one of the issues for me was that the documentation just didn't quite hit the sweet spot. At least the bits I found were either too high-level or too implementation-specific. So here's a set of notes on how a portal works, in the hope that this is actually correct.

First, Portals are supposed to be a way for sandboxed applications (flatpaks) to trigger functionality they don't have direct access too. The prime example: opening a file without the application having access to $HOME. This is done by the applications talking to portals instead of doing the functionality themselves.

There is really only one portal process: /usr/libexec/xdg-desktop-portal, started as a systemd user service. That process owns a DBus bus name (org.freedesktop.portal.Desktop) and an object on that name (/org/freedesktop/portal/desktop). You can see that bus name and object with D-Feet, from DBus' POV there's nothing special about it. What makes it the portal is simply that the application running inside the sandbox can talk to that DBus name and thus call the various methods. Obviously the xdg-desktop-portal needs to run outside the sandbox to do its things.

There are multiple portal interfaces, all available on that one object. Those interfaces have names like org.freedesktop.portal.FileChooser (to open/save files). The xdg-desktop-portal implements those interfaces and thus handles any method calls on those interfaces. So where an application is sandboxed, it doesn't implement the functionality itself, it instead calls e.g. the OpenFile() method on the org.freedesktop.portal.FileChooser interface. Then it gets an fd back and can read the content of that file without needing full access to the file system.

Some interfaces are fully handled within xdg-desktop-portal. For example, the Camera portal checks a few things internally, pops up a dialog for the user to confirm access to if needed [1] but otherwise there's nothing else involved with this specific method call.

Other interfaces have a backend "implementation" DBus interface. For example, the org.freedesktop.portal.FileChooser interface has a org.freedesktop.impl.portal.FileChooser (notice the "impl") counterpart. xdg-desktop-portal does not implement those impl.portals. xdg-desktop-portal instead routes the DBus calls to the respective "impl.portal". Your sandboxed application calls OpenFile(), xdg-desktop-portal now calls OpenFile() on org.freedesktop.impl.portal.FileChooser. That interface returns a value, xdg-desktop-portal extracts it and returns it back to the application in respones to the original OpenFile() call.

What provides those impl.portals doesn't matter to xdg-desktop-portal, and this is where things are hot-swappable. GTK and Qt both provide (some of) those impl portals, There are GTK and Qt-specific portals with xdg-desktop-portal-gtk and xdg-desktop-portal-kde but another one is provided by GNOME Shell directly. You can check the files in /usr/share/xdg-desktop-portal/portals/ and see which impl portal is provided on which bus name. The reason those impl.portals exist is so they can be native to the desktop environment - regardless what application you're running and with a generic xdg-desktop-portal, you see the native file chooser dialog for your desktop environment.

So the full call sequence is:

  • At startup, xdg-desktop-portal parses the /usr/libexec/xdg-desktop-portal/*.portal files to know which impl.portal interface is provided on which bus name
  • The application calls OpenFile() on the org.freedesktop.portal.FileChooser interface on the object path /org/freedesktop/portal/desktop. It can do so because the bus name this object sits on is not restricted by the sandbox
  • xdg-desktop-portal receives that call. This is portal with an impl.portal so xdg-desktop-portal calls OpenFile() on the bus name that provides the org.freedesktop.impl.portal.FileChooser interface (as previously established by reading the *.portal files)
  • Assuming xdg-desktop-portal-gtk provides that portal at the moment, that process now pops up a GTK FileChooser dialog that runs outside the sandbox. User selects a file
  • xdg-desktop-portal-gtk sends back the fd for the file to the xdg-desktop-portal, and the impl.portal parts are done
  • xdg-desktop-portal receives that fd and sends it back as reply to the OpenFile() method in the normal portal
  • The application receives the fd and can read the file now
A few details here aren't fully correct, but it's correct enough to understand the sequence - the exact details depend on the method call anyway.

Finally: because of DBus restrictions, the various methods in the portal interfaces don't just reply with values. Instead, the xdg-desktop-portal creates a new org.freedesktop.portal.Request object and returns the object path for that. Once that's done the method is complete from DBus' POV. When the actual return value arrives (e.g. the fd), that value is passed via a signal on that Request object, which is then destroyed. This roundabout way is done for purely technical reasons, regular DBus methods would time out while the user picks a file path.

Anyway. Maybe this helps someone understanding how the portal bits fit together.

[1] it does so using another portal but let's ignore that
[2] not really hot-swappable though. You need to restart xdg-desktop-portal but not your host. So luke-warm-swappable only

Edit Sep 01: clarify that it's not GTK/Qt providing the portals, but xdg-desktop-portal-gtk and -kde

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

libei - a status update

A year ago, I first announced libei - a library to support emulated input. After an initial spurt of development, it was left mostly untouched until a few weeks ago. Since then, another flurry of changes have been added, including some initial integration into GNOME's mutter. So, let's see what has changed.

A Recap

First, a short recap of what libei is: it's a transport layer for emulated input events to allow for any application to control the pointer, type, etc. But, unlike the XTEST extension in X, libei allows the compositor to be in control over clients, the devices they can emulate and the input events as well. So it's safer than XTEST but also a lot more flexible. libei already supports touch and smooth scrolling events, something XTest doesn't have or is struggling with.

Terminology refresher: libei is the client library (used by an application wanting to emulate input), EIS is the Emulated Input Server, i.e. the part that typically runs in the compositor.

Server-side Devices

So what has changed recently: first, the whole approach has flipped on its head - now a libei client connects to the EIS implementation and "binds" to the seats the EIS implementation provides. The EIS implementation then provides input devices to the client. In the simplest case, that's just a relative pointer but we have capabilities for absolute pointers, keyboards and touch as well. Plans for the future is to add gestures and tablet support too. Possibly joysticks, but I haven't really thought about that in detail yet.

So basically, the initial conversation with an EIS implementation goes like this:

  • Client: Hello, I am $NAME
  • Server: Hello, I have "seat0" and "seat1"
  • Client: Bind to "seat0" for pointer, keyboard and touch
  • Server: Here is a pointer device
  • Server: Here is a keyboard device
  • Client: Send relative motion event 10/2 through the pointer device
Notice how the touch device is missing? The capabilities the client binds to are just what the client wants, the server doesn't need to actually give the client a device for that capability.

One of the design choices for libei is that devices are effectively static. If something changes on the EIS side, the device is removed and a new device is created with the new data. This applies for example to regions and keymaps (see below), so libei clients need to be able to re-create their internal states whenever the screen or the keymap changes.

Device Regions

Devices can now have regions attached to them, also provided by the EIS implementation. These regions define areas reachable by the device and are required for clients such as Barrier. On a dual-monitor setup you may have one device with two regions or two devices with one region (representing one monitor), it depends on the EIS implementation. But either way, as libei client you will know that there is an area and you will know how to reach any given pixel on that area. Since the EIS implementation decides the regions, it's possible to have areas that are unreachable by emulated input (though I'm struggling a bit for a real-world use-case).

So basically, the conversation with an EIS implementation goes like this:

  • Client: Hello, I am $NAME
  • Server: Hello, I have "seat0" and "seat1"
  • Client: Bind to "seat0" for absolute pointer
  • Server: Here is an abs pointer device with regions 1920x1080@0,0, 1080x1920@1920,0
  • Server: Here is an abs pointer device with regions 1920x1080@0,0
  • Server: Here is an abs pointer device with regions 1080x1920@1920,0
  • Client: Send abs position 100/100 through the second device
Notice how we have three absolute devices? A client emulating a tablet that is mapped to a screen could just use the third device. As with everything, the server decides what devices are created and the clients have to figure out what they want to do and how to do it.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the use of regions make libei clients windowing-system independent. The Barrier EI support WIP no longer has any Wayland-specific code in it. In theory, we could implement EIS in the X server and libei clients would work against that unmodified.

Keymap handling

The keymap handling has been changed so the keymap too is provided by the EIS implementation now, effectively in the same way as the Wayland compositor provides the keymap to Wayland clients. This means a client knows what keycodes to send, it can handle the state to keep track of things, etc. Using Barrier as an example again - if you want to generate an "a", you need to look up the keymap to figure out which keycode generates an A, then you can send that through libei to actually press the key.

Admittedly, this is quite messy. XKB (and specifically libxkbcommon) does not make it easy to go from a keysym to a key code. The existing Barrier X code is full of corner-cases with XKB already, I espect those to be necessary for the EI support as well.

Scrolling

Scroll events have four types: pixel-based scrolling, discrete scrolling, and scroll stop/cancel events. The first should be obvious, discrete scrolling is for mouse wheels. It uses the same 120-based API that Windows (and the kernel) use, so it's compatible with high-resolution wheel mice. The scroll stop event notifies an EIS implementation that the scroll interaction has stopped (e.g. lifting fingers off) which in turn may start kinetic scrolling - just like the libinput/Wayland scroll stop events. The scroll cancel event notifies the EIS implementation that scrolling really has stopped and no kinetic scrolling should be triggered. There's no equivalent in libinput/Wayland for this yet but it helps to get the hook in place.

Emulation "Transactions"

This has fairly little functional effect, but interactions with an EIS server are now sandwiched in a start/stop emulating pair. While this doesn't matter for one-shot tools like xdotool, it does matter for things like Barrier which can send the start emulating event when the pointer enters the local window. This again allows the EIS implementation to provide some visual feedback to the user. To correct the example from above, the sequence is actually:

  • ...
  • Server: Here is a pointer device
  • Client: Start emulating
  • Client: Send relative motion event 10/2 through the pointer device
  • Client: Send relative motion event 1/4 through the pointer device
  • Client: Stop emulating

Properties

Finally, there is now a generic property API, something copied from PipeWire. Properties are simple key/value string pairs and cover those things that aren't in the immediate API. One example here: the portal can set things like "ei.application.appid" to the Flatpak's appid. Properties can be locked down and only libei itself can set properties before the initial connection. This makes them reliable enough for the EIS implementation to make decisions based on their values. Just like with PipeWire, the list of useful properties will grow over time. it's too early to tell what is really needed.

Repositories

Now, for the actual demo bits: I've added enough support to Barrier, XWayland, Mutter and GNOME Shell that I can control a GNOME on Wayland session through Barrier (note: the controlling host still needs to run X since we don't have the ability to capture input events under Wayland yet). The keymap handling in Barrier is nasty but it's enough to show that it can work.

GNOME Shell has a rudimentary UI, again just to show what works:

The status icon shows ... if libei clients are connected, it changes to !!! while the clients are emulating events. Clients are listed by name and can be disconnected at will. I am not a designer, this is just a PoC to test the hooks.

Note how xdotool is listed in this screenshot: that tool is unmodified, it's the XWayland libei implementation that allows it to work and show up correctly

The various repositories are in the "wip/ei" branch of:

And of course libei itself.

Where to go from here? The last weeks were driven by rapid development, so there's plenty of test cases to be written to make sure the new code actually works as intended. That's easy enough. Looking at the Flatpak integration is another big ticket item, once the portal details are sorted all the pieces are (at least theoretically) in place. That aside, improving the integrations into the various systems above is obviously what's needed to get this working OOTB on the various distributions. Right now it's all very much in alpha stage and I could use help with all of those (unless you're happy to wait another year or so...). Do ping me if you're interested to work on any of this.

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

It's templates all the way down - part 4

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

After getting thouroughly nerd-sniped a few weeks back, we now have FreeBSD support through qemu in the freedesktop.org ci-templates. This is possible through the qemu image generation we have had for quite a while now. So let's see how we can easily add a FreeBSD VM (or other distributions) to our gitlab CI pipeline:

.freebsd:
  variables:
     FDO_DISTRIBUTION_VERSION: '13.0'
     FDO_DISTRIBUTION_TAG: 'freebsd.0' # some value for humans to read
     
build-image:
  extends:
     - .freebsd
     - .fdo.qemu-build@freebsd
  variables:
    FDO_DISTRIBUTION_PACKAGES: "curl wget"
Now, so far this may all seem quite familiar. And indeed, this is almost exactly the same process as for normal containers (see Part 1), the only difference is the .fdo.qemu-build base template. Using this template means we build an image babushka: our desired BSD image is actual a QEMU RAW image sitting inside another generic container image. That latter image only exists to start the QEMU image and set up the environment if need be, you don't need to care what distribution it runs out (Fedora for now).

Because of the nesting, we need to handle this accordingly in our script: tag for the actual test job - we need to start the image and make sure our jobs are actually built within. The templates set up an ssh alias "vm" for this and the vmctl script helps to do things on the vm:

test-build:
  extends:
    - .freebsd
    - .fdo.distribution-image@freebsd
  script:
    # start our QEMU image
    - /app/vmctl start
    
    # copy our current working directory to the VM
    # (this is a yaml multiline command to work around the colon)
    - |
      scp -r $PWD vm:
      
    # Run the build commands on the VM and if they succeed, create a .success file
    - /app/vmctl exec "cd $CI_PROJECT_NAME; meson builddir; ninja -C builddir" && touch .success || true
    
    # Copy results back to our run container so we can include them in artifacts:
    - |
      scp -r vm:$CI_PROJECT_NAME/builddir .
      
    # kill the VM
    - /app/vmctl stop
    
    # Now that we have cleaned up: if our build job before
    # failed, exit with an error
    - [[ -e .success ]] || exit 1
Now, there's a bit to unpack but with the comments above it should be fairly obvious what is happening. We start the VM, copy our working directory over and then run a command on the VM before cleaning up. The reason we use touch .success is simple: it allows us to copy things out and clean up before actually failing the job.

Obviously, if you want to build any other distribution you just swap the freebsd out for fedora or whatever - the process is the same. libinput has been using fedora qemu images for ages now.

Tuesday, July 27, 2021

libinput and hold gestures

Thanks to the work done by Josè Expòsito, libinput 1.19 will ship with a new type of gesture: Hold Gestures. So far libinput supported swipe (moving multiple fingers in the same direction) and pinch (moving fingers towards each other or away from each other). These gestures are well-known, commonly used, and familiar to most users. For example, GNOME 40 recently has increased its use of touchpad gestures to switch between workspaces, etc. Swipe and pinch gestures require movement, it was not possible (for callers) to detect fingers on the touchpad that don't move.

This gap is now filled by Hold gestures. These are triggered when a user puts fingers down on the touchpad, without moving the fingers. This allows for some new interactions and we had two specific ones in mind: hold-to-click, a common interaction on older touchscreen interfaces where holding a finger in place eventually triggers the context menu. On a touchpad, a three-finger hold could zoom in, or do dictionary lookups, or kill a kitten. Whatever matches your user interface most, I guess.

The second interaction was the ability to stop kinetic scrolling. libinput does not actually provide kinetic scrolling, it merely provides the information needed in the client to do it there: specifically, it tells the caller when a finger was lifted off a touchpad at the end of a scroll movement. It's up to the caller (usually: the toolkit) to implement the kinetic scrolling effects. One missing piece was that while libinput provided information about lifting the fingers, it didn't provide information about putting fingers down again later - a common way to stop scrolling on other systems.

Hold gestures are intended to address this: a hold gesture triggered after a flick with two fingers can now be used by callers (read: toolkits) to stop scrolling.

Now, one important thing about hold gestures is that they will generate a lot of false positives, so be careful how you implement them. The vast majority of interactions with the touchpad will trigger some movement - once that movement hits a certain threshold the hold gesture will be cancelled and libinput sends out the movement events. Those events may be tiny (depending on touchpad sensitivity) so getting the balance right for the aforementioned hold-to-click gesture is up to the caller.

As usual, the required bits to get hold gestures into the wayland protocol are either in the works, mid-flight or merge-ready so expect this to hit the various repositories over the medium-term future.